THE G.I. FACTOR: ANSWERED QUESTIONS

I’M CONFASED ABOUT THE G.I. OF RICE. SOME PEOPLE SAY IT HAS A HIGH G.L FACTOR, OTHERS SAY IT IS LOW.

Rices in Australia usually have a high G.L factor because their amylose content is low. On page 34 we described how amylose is a form of starch which is more difficult to digest and results in lower G.L factors. Doongara and Basmati, are high in amylose and have relatively low G.L factors. You can guess at the G.L factor of rice by its appearance after cooking. If it is sticky and individual grains clump together, the rice is likely to have a high G.L factor. On the other hand, if the rice is dry and the grains separate, it is likely to have a relatively low G.L factor. There are many varieties of rice which show intermediate characteristics and therefore have intermediate G.I.s.

A high fat food may have a low G.I. factor. Doesn’t this give a falsely favourable impression of that food for people with diabetes?

Yes it does. The G.L factor of potato crisps or French fries is lower than baked potatoes. The G.L of corn chips is lower than sweet corn. It is important not to base your food choices on the G.L factor alone. It is essential to look at the fat content of foods as well. Low-fat eating is best for everyone, especially people with diabetes.

*91\42\4*

  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter